Installation Views

Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer
Jean-Paul Riopelle | Galerie LeRoyer

Press Release

“Ayarak” is an Inuit term that describes something universal: the string. More precisely, it describes a string used in a game that has been played for generations amongst indigenous populations in Canada. In this game you tie a knot at both ends to create a loop. You, then, slide the string between your fingers and around your hands, sometimes with help from your teeth or a friend, to create interesting shapes and geometric patterns.

The Inuit call these shapes “Ayarauseq.” They are made to represent a variety of things including: seals, whales, caribou, seagulls, tents, lamps, a crawling hunter and a man with wide eyes. These shapes are words.

I imagine that, on both sides, one will look with nostalgia at these string combinations, invented in the Arctic Circle: rigorous, repeatable and transmissible like theorems. These are the ties that bring together the polar bear and the crow.

Jean-Paul Riopelle